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Listing of entities for Polish and EU sanctions
At the EU and national levels, severe economic sanctions are in place against many entities, mainly Russian. After entry into force of the Sanctions Act (the Act on Special Solutions for Countering Support of Aggression Against Ukraine and Protecting National Security of 13 April 2022), first published on 26 April 2022, the Polish sanctions list maintained by the Minister of the Interior and Administration took on particular significance. The purpose of its creation is clear: to counter support for Russia’s aggression against Ukraine. Nevertheless, the criteria for inclusion in the list are not clear-cut, and the procedure for issuing a listing decision greatly limits the right to defend against wrongful inclusion, as Polish entities can easily be included in the list.
Listing of entities for Polish and EU sanctions
Sanctions for violating sanctions
Until now, the obligation to comply with the EU economic sanctions regime has arisen directly from the EU regulations, in particular Regulation 833/2014 and Regulation 765/2006 containing restrictive measures against Russian and Belarusian entities, but violation of bans has not been subject to fines. This situation should change, as a bill on special solutions to prevent the support of aggression against Ukraine and to protect national security is being taken up in the Polish parliament.
Sanctions for violating sanctions
Extraditions should finally be taken seriously
Some 70–80 extradition requests are filed every year with the Polish authorities, to turn over persons to stand trial before a foreign court or serve a punishment abroad.
Extraditions should finally be taken seriously
How can Russia combat sanctions?
The Russian Federation has not remained passive in the face of sanctions imposed on it for its invasion of Ukraine. In retaliation, Russia has imposed its own sanctions on Western countries and has announced the nationalisation of property of companies ceasing or suspending their activities in Russia. However, this has not exhausted its arsenal yet, and it may not be long before there are further actions by the Russian Federation in the international arena challenging the legality of the measures hitting the Russian economy.
How can Russia combat sanctions?
The impact of EU economic sanctions on business contracts
24 February 2022, the day when Russian troops unlawfully invaded the territory of Ukraine, proved to be the beginning of a test of European solidarity, and of the resilience of the European economy. On a macro level, a huge question has arisen: Can the European economy function without eastern markets? At the micro level, businesses are faced with dilemmas of how to deal with counterparties from that region, particularly in the context of existing long-term contracts at an advanced stage of completion.
The impact of EU economic sanctions on business contracts
Compensation for human rights violations in supply chains
Businesses are to be held legally accountable for failing to exercise due diligence to prevent human rights violations from occurring in their supply chains. On 23 February 2022, the European Commission published a long-awaited draft Directive on Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence.
Compensation for human rights violations in supply chains
US secondary sanctions: The Court of Justice interprets the EU Blocking Statute
On 21 December 2021, the Court of Justice of the European Union issued a long-awaited judgment on the interpretation of the EU Blocking Statute in C-124/20, Bank Melli. Although the ruling does not dispel all doubts, it does set the direction for interpretation and shows that even imperfect regulations must be applied.
US secondary sanctions: The Court of Justice interprets the EU Blocking Statute
Recast regulation on export control of dual-use items: What will change?
The Recast Dual-Use Regulation entered into force on 9 September 2021, replacing the regulation from 2009, governing controls of items with both civil and military purposes. What key changes does the new regulation introduce?
Recast regulation on export control of dual-use items: What will change?
Export of dual-use goods—what you should keep in mind
Compliance with export control regulations poses a growing challenge for participants in international trade in goods and providers of cross-border services. The size of the enterprise is irrelevant. Multinational corporations are subject to the same restrictions and consequences for infringement as small businesses or individuals. Every participant in trade must determine whether a planned export of goods, technologies or services requires a permit or completion of other formalities to avoid exposure to financial losses or criminal liability.
Export of dual-use goods—what you should keep in mind
The real cause and the hard cure for the “regulatory chill” of international investment agreements
There is a growing concern among human rights advocates that states—in particular capital-importing ones—are not doing enough to protect their societies against human rights abuses related to foreign investments. The common conviction is that this has to do with the “regulatory chill” caused by international investment agreements (IIAs). States reportedly hesitate to pursue regulations and policies promoting human rights, in fear of being sued in the international arbitration provided for by IIAs for unduly interfering with foreign investors’ interests.
The real cause and the hard cure for the “regulatory chill” of international investment agreements
Export control of automated and autonomous vehicle technologies
Autonomous vehicles will be an essential part of the mobility of the future. Cars can already relieve the driver in many situations, and the R&D sector for autonomous vehicles is booming. Companies are investing in sensor and machine-learning technology, creating pilot programmes to test self-driving vehicles at levels 4 and 5 of automation. But the export of some of these technologies may be restricted due to potential military applications.
Export control of automated and autonomous vehicle technologies
The EU global sanctions regime: How human rights affect supply chains
On 7 December 2020, the Council of the European Union adopted a decision and a regulation establishing a global sanctions regime for human rights violations. On this basis, the EU will be able to impose sanctions on persons, entities and bodies involved in or responsible for serious human rights violations and abuses worldwide—no matter where in the world such actions take place. As soon as possible, EU undertakings active on the global market should adapt their internal compliance systems and reflect human rights issues in designing their supply chains.
The EU global sanctions regime: How human rights affect supply chains